Loading...

Helping Those In Need

Our community is coming together to meet the needs of those directly affected by this crisis.

  • The Dohmen Company Foundation has partnered with Common Ground Healthcare Cooperative (CGHC) to launch a program that will supply 14 free meals per week to 100 CGHC members in need throughout the city, the BizTimes reported. 
  • Milwaukee Courier has an excellent list of apps and activity ideas for your kids. Regenia Henderson has started making masks for masks out of her Milwaukee home and her business is finding customers nationwide.
  • Rice N Roll Bistro Milwaukee has been busy making meals and delivering them to the healthcare workers at Columbia St. Mary’s. 
  • Many Milwaukeeans are using their professions in surprising ways to help the community. Local photographer Andrew Feller is one of them. He’s been taking moving portraits of local business owners (from a safe distance) in front of their businesses to help promote their services during this incredibly difficult economy. 
  • Milwaukee Repertory Theater’s costume and set-design masters are putting their collective creative-power to create over 10,000 masks for local healthcare workers. 
  • Ayuda Matua MKE is a new group based on the south side that is translating coronavirus-related information for Spanish-speakers, and is also helping to feed the community by hosting pop-up food pantries. 
  • Fashion and footwear hotspot Bouchard’s has donated 10,000 face masks to Milwaukee-area hospitals and first responders.
  • Enterprise Holdings, which operates a number of rental car companies, has been offering a number of creative ways to help those who might need transportation assistance. 
  • To help seniors during the crisis, Catholic Charities has set up a senior hotline and will call, visit, and follow-up to check in on how older Milwaukeeans are doing. This way Catholic Charities is best able to assess needs and offer help, including shopping for groceries, picking up medication, or simply being there to listen. The hotline number is 414-771-6063. 
  • Milwaukee Rep staffers have started making face masks for local hospitals.
  • Washbnb typically offers laundry services for area Airbnb rental properties. They’ve pivoted their business and are now offering laundry services for all who need them, with steep discounts for those who are elderly, immunocompromised, or economically disadvantaged.
  • At Miss Molly’s Cafe in Wauwatosa you can purchase a boxed lunch that will be donated to first responders and essential workers at local hospitals. 
  • Kenosha-basked Jockey announced plans to donate hundreds of thousands of gowns and masks to hospitals across the country. 
  • 88Nine Radio Milwaukee and gener8tor, through the Backline program, have launched an emergency response program for local artists. 
  • Logan Productions, a locally owned company that offers high-end webcasting and virtual event services, has been helping local churches and nonprofits transition their services to a virtual environment.
  • Central Standard Craft Distillery usually makes delectable spirits, but is putting those talents to a slightly different use. They're now creating bottles of sprayable hand sanitizer from vodka, and giving the hand sanitizer away for free to at-risk groups like nursing homes, homeless shelters, first responders, and food banks. We'll drink to that.
  • Milwaukee's hospitality community has already been greatly impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak. Seeking to help fill employment gaps, locals have created a Facebook group that seeks to connect out-of-work service industry members with odd jobs. With nearly 3,000 members, the group is already beginning to share success stories, like the former pub employee who has been able to earn extra cash detailing cars through the help of this group.
  • Families are posting signs in their neighborhood letting others know they can help. This is just one of what is likely thousands of Milwaukee families directly supporting their neighbors. Kimberley Bayer posted signs in her neighborhood offering to support those on her block by doing grocery shopping, making meals, or simply checking in daily with phone calls. It's gestures like this that can mean the most to those with the fewest resources. More examples are coming out about neighbors helping each other every day!
  • The entire Bucks roster is donating money to help Fiserv Forum workers
  • The Milwaukee Brewers are donating $1 million to assist ballpark employees affected by delay to season
  • SC Johnson commits $5 million to support public needs during the coronavirus pandemic
  • A local man’s birthday Go Fund Me fundraiser raised $18,000 to help local out-of-work service industry employees
  • Tips left at Nonfiction Wine in Bay View will go toward a different restaurant’s employees each day 
  • Some of Milwaukee’s youth groups, whose work is critically important for fostering mentorship and community among Milwaukee’s young people, are getting creative in the way they’re connecting their members virtually. 
  • Other restaurants, like Lazy Susan, Bounce Milwaukee, and a handful of others, are getting especially creative to help stay afloat. One concept they’ve united behind is a gift card that appreciates in value over time for its buyer -- an idea that prevents restaurants from going under later if all of the gift cards purchased now were redeemed at the same time. 
  • MSOE’s School of Nursing coordinated the efforts of nursing schools throughout Wisconsin to “Adopt a Hospital” and donate protective equipment like gloves and masks.
  • GE Healthcare, which is based in Chicago but has a presence in our region, plans to work “around the clock” to produce ventilators so that U.S. hospitals can keep up with demand spurred by COVID-19.
  • The Milwaukee Way Tech Hub has created a grant program for small businesses. Deadline to apply is March 30.
  • Amilinda, the wonderful Spanish/Portuguese restaurant on Wisconsin Avenue, is paying it forward. The purchase of a gift card also goes toward buying meals for hospitality workers whose livelihood has been affected by the pandemic. 
  • An opportunity for you to keep the good things brewings: Sip & Purr Cafe is requesting help sponsoring the homeless cats that provide free cuddles and purrs throughout the cafe during regular hours. 
  • Gannett, which owns many newspapers in the state including the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, launched a new website that makes buying gift cards from local businesses very easy.
  • Wantable is using its fulfillment center to create and distribute face masks. 
  • A Wauwatosa doctor asked family and friends to help source protective gear for healthcare workers at the Medical College of Wisconsin and received more than 400 items in a matter of days.
  • Miller Lite donated $1 million to help out-of-work bartenders. 
  • An effort by 25 Milwaukee organizations dubbed the “Maskforce” has mobilized to produce personal protective equipment by the hundreds of thousands for nurses and doctors on the frontlines of the pandemic.
  • Breweries owned by Molson Coors will now make hand sanitizer in bulk.
  • Blackline Limousines is looking for ways to donate its drivers' time to help the community. If your organization could use Blackline's help, call 414-481-2599 for availability. 
  • Area distributor Beer Capitol is buying back unused kegs to help their bar customers during the crisis.
  • Northwestern Mutual, through its Foundation, announced a donation of more than $1.5 million to support its nonprofit partners nationwide in leading efforts to provide immediate relief in response to the effects of COVID-19. These grants will address the anticipated food and essential supply needs facing those in our communities.
  • The city of Milwaukee is working with the St. Francis de Sales Seminary to house local homeless people. The 110 rooms will be divided up to separate those who are showing symptoms of COVID-19 and those who aren’t. Local hotels donated linens for this initiative.
  • Olympus Group, which usually creates mascot costumes like Bucky Badger’s and those of the Racine Sausages, is now making masks for area healthcare workers.
  • Just over a decade ago, researchers from the Medical College of Wisconsin and Children’s Hospital became the first in the world to sequence a person’s entire genome and use that sequencing to find a disease. This research is now illuminating the way for research on finding a cure or vaccine for COVID-19.